The interbellum: 1922

In this post the reader will find a number of interesting pictures.

One of them shows a plaque indicating the house where Roberto J. Payró lived in  Brussels from 1909 to 1922. He was correspondent for an Argentinean newspaper and covered World War I while in Brussels.

Two other pictures are about Count Charles Woeste. He died in 1922. He was a prominent figure of the “Catholic Party”. This is in contrast with his education: he attended a non-confessional school (Royal Atheneum of Brussels) and he was made Doctor in Law at the “Université Libre de Bruxelles”, a university founded by a group of free masons, as a counterweight to the “Université Catholique de Louvain.”

Another prominent Belgian figure who died in 1922 was Ernest Solvay. He was an industrialist who founded the Solvay Group. He became very much involved in the advancement of sciences (see my post on 1911, year of the first Solvay Physics Conference). In the monument that apperars in this post he is remembered as the founder of the Comité National (1914-1918). The “Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation” (Committee for Relief in Belgium) was the organisation, set-up by a number of prominent Belgians,  to provide food to the Belgian population during World War I.  There is a another monument to E. Solvay in the neighbourhood of Solvay’s headquarters in Brussels.

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